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and writes council demands the sri lankan government investigate alleged war crimes. and emotions run high in australia. u.s. president barack obama is meeting the palestinian president must learn abbas in the occupied west bank during it is his first trip to both israel and the occupied palestinian territory since he became a presidential candidate .n 2008 gate let's go straight to nicole johnson who is in rom -- in ramala. tell us how talks have been so far. it seems that nicole cannot hear us right now. for now, we will carry on with the truth of barack obama in ramala. he is thereafter spending some time in israel during he is due to return back to israel after spending a few hours in the west bank. i believe now we have nicole johnson in ramala. can you hear me? it seems that we once again have some audio difficulties. let's put this in some. as this visit happens, two explosions in southern israel, only a few hours ago, is a stark reminder of the reality on the ground. israeli police say that the rockets were fired from gaza. there are no reports of injuries. the european central ban
's security, and to speak directly to the people of israel and to your neighbors. >> the israeli government hopes washington can help tackle the region's most pressing challenges. the upheavals triggered by the arabs spring have increased political instability, and the threat of iran's nuclear program is ever present, but not everyone is happy to see obama. palestinians in the occupied west bank and here on the gaza strip have been protesting. >> obama's visit shows that the u.s. is providing legitimacy and support to the occupation of our land. >> obama is scheduled to travel to the west bank and jordan before leaving the region on saturday. >> let's cross over now live to our correspondent, who is covering the president's visit for us. barack obama and benjamin netanyahu have not enjoyed the warmest of relationships. how did they come across at the press conference? >> this was an interesting press conference. they tried to joke around. they clearly tried to show that at this time, they were trying to put personal differences aside. experts all say they might not become best friends, but
to no state. attacking states, laying low state governments, depleting the taliban, defeating al qaeda -- iraq. it will not stop it because terrorism, like sustainability, like markets, are interdependent in their character. so what we have created in the beginning of the 21st century is a deep asymmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent, global cross frontier, and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that asymmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years in copen hagueen and going through mexico city and dubai and nations came together to renew the kyoto protocol already out of term of the date. at least to embrace that antiquated document and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty says china said the u.s., says now canada, even leaders on keogh know doesn't permit us to monitor, to report to international body, doesn't pe
, eyewitnesses said the rebels control strategic locations. foreign forces helping the government also suffered a defeat. the south african soldiers were tasked with guarding bangui. is himself a former soldier. ruleast few months of his were turbulent. his term is not up until 2016. rebels said they want to hold elections. there is still heavy fighting in bangui. a peaceful transition is not on the cards. >> paris musharraf has returned home from self-imposed exile, declaring he was to save the country. musharraf spent the past four years in london and dubai, but now wants to take part in elections this may. >> coming home may herald a comeback for musharraf. greeting supporters after stepping off his flight. i've come back, putting my life in danger, in order to save pakistan. >> not everyone in pakistan is happy he is home. the military man made many enemies as president. in 2008, musharraf was forced to quit amid political turmoil i. his political past could come back to haunt him. pakistan's teledyne hates musharraf because he supported george w. bush's war on terror hatesevision -- taliba
with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registrati
arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizona law. and today's arguments on the heels of another case that could roll back a key portion of the voting rights act of 1965. for more on today's arguments, we turn as always to marcia coyle of the "national law journal." she was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. so the outcome, marcia, of this could actually tip the federal-state balance on who gets to govern how we vote. >> that's true, gwen. the question before the justices is where do you draw the line between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other doe
, people in cyprus are standing in lines at cash machines. banks remain closed as the government's scramble to put together a new bailout plan for the broken financial sector. >> the clock is ticking. ecb says cyprus must come up with ed bop -- viable bailout plan by monday. if not, there will cut off funding, also listening the country into bankruptcy. >> there's also talk of a solidarity investment fund that could include bonds backed by the government and even by churches. >> angry separates -- cyprian -- separates -- cypriots gathered outside the parliament building here the latest reports say cypriot officials are mulling a special fund as contributions coming reportedly from the island's wealthy orthodox church, from pension funds, and the central bank's gold reserves. the governor of the island's central bank was confident a solution would be found. >> i expect there will be a program of support for cyprus until monday. >> as the politicians tried to come up with a last-to address you, the mood on the streets debt is to spur a panic. earlier in the day, police clashed with angry bank
of government offices and businesses early. traffic jacks and some gridlock across the city. the same time, today was marked by new political uncertainty. lack lab announced provincial elections would be put off for six months. iraqi government sources are telling us now that the delay will be extented for all provinces across iraq. so in some, while the security has mostly improved in iraq over the last few years, the anniversary was a reminder of the darker days. >> bret: yeah, dave, what were you hearing and seeing? what were you hearing from the iraqis? were they shocked by this bombing, the series of bombings? >> guest: i think the bombings came as somewhat of a shock. although, everyone was aware of the anniversary. there have been bombings on previous verses haves, but the same time. the anniversary is a day that marks some upate and anger on the part of iraqis toward we werers. westerns are not so much of a target in iraq anymore. so depth and the amount of bombing was a surprise. certainly the announcement by prime minister al-awlaki was a big surprise. >> bret: what about the sec
on the pump. we also realize between the state and federal government a lot of us are paying 40-plus cents a gallon to build the road that we're wearing out with the gas we put in. that's a user's fee. when i came here and break this down and asked the question, of tax/user rth of gas fee, 18.3 cents a gallon, $1 of that, how much of that actually goes into roads and bridges? and i'll tell you it adds up like this -- then we reduce it a little bit on this number. three cents out of that dollar went for trails for bike trails, snowmobile trails and that sort of thing. 3%. there was a one time $16 million in one of our appropriation bills to do -- to clean graffiti off of the walls, retaining walls in new jersey. and i thought, can't they get their prisoners out there with a wire brush to do that? and 28% going for environmental arciological -- interest, looking for arrowheads and endangered species. can't somebody pay for that rather than the people driving on the roads? when you add davis-bacon to that, another 20%, 22%, so you have 3% for trails, you have 28% for our achepologicl and env
control over a fractious government? or is it all those things? this is not a discussion rooted in the past. we will not relive the wmd questions. we will not dwell on the mistakes of the coalition authority, and we will not debate the surge. we will look at iraq today and where it is headed. a has been little of that in the 10 years media coverage, even though it is a far more relevant question for policy makers and the public today. with that, because you did not come here to hear me today, that we introduce the plan all. all on the who they are.-- know who they are. you know their contributions to the efforts to stabilize iraq. to my right is ambassador ryan crocker, who is the kissinger senior fellow at the el sity. sal.-- yale univer he has served recently as our ambassador to afghanistan, his long career included ambassadors for iraq as well as our ambassador to pakistan, syria, kuwait, and lebanon. from may to august of 2003, he served as the government's director for the coalition provisional authority in baghdad, and his career in the foreign service included a tour in
a government shutdown, we update the short- and long-term budget battles. >> sreenivasan: paul solman looks at free trade through the eyes of a classic american brand, getting wet in the global market. >> i know that every surfboard that comes into america comes in duty free. and when i sell a surfboard to australia, japan, europe, its a 20% to 25% duty that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, a
to shut down the government, when it was shut down for three weeks when newt gingrich was trying to control bill clinton and his spending, and he is giving up his card. when boehner says we don't have an immediate dead crisis he is giving up his cards. he doesn't want to actually do something about this but likes being speaker. >> neil: they're looking at the next -- the end of this month we're facing yet another potential crisis. they're going to argue that the government could shut down. and this is their attempt to say, we won't brick -- bring it to that pranksmanship because we don't want it on our door step we caused it. but it's going to boomerang on them. they retook the upper hand and now they're giving it away. >> exactly right. sequestration was passed a year and a half ago, part of the plan a year and a half ago. all the republicans had to do is keep their mouth shut and stay out of the way. thank god they did that. here we go again. if they're not going to stand up now, to obama, and this absolute mindless spending, and borrowing and printing, then i have to say, neil
do hussein was removed, for sure. at the government level, the strategic agreement is still in place, but it would not be wrong to say that the government of see at the moment does not the american presence or influence as an integral part of its political calculation. it was a few years ago when political decisions were taken. they always factored in what the americans fought and that was certainly true. you probably remember when your the ambassador to baghdad. i do not think that is the situation now. i would even ventured to say that there is more wait for what the iranian regime things about political decisions in iraq, whether it is forming a cabinet any other major political decision. thathat does not mean americans have lost all possible influence. i think americans still have a considerable amount of soft power. i think they should use it not only with the government, and they are actually using it, to be fair, in support of civil society. i think in supporting the segment of population who are secular in their outlook, who believe that the separation of religion from the st
. >> ( translated ): it is the duty of the israeli government to at least halt the activity so that we can speak of issues. and when we define our borders and their borders together, each side will know its territory in which it can do whatever it pleases. so the issue of settlement is clear. >> warner: but the president said pre-conditions for talks were counter-productive. >> we do not consider continued settlement activity to be constructive, to be appropriate, to be something that can advance the cause of peace. if the only way to even begin the conversations is that we get everything right at the outset, or at least each party is then we're never going to get to the broader issue, which is how do you actually structure a state of palestine that is a sovereign, contiguous, and provide the palestinian people dignity. >> warner: the president also met with young palestinians, many of whom have lost faith in any resolution to the decades- long conflict. back in jerusalem, before a larger crowd of similarly-young israelis the president gave the featured address of his mideast tour. while reitera
consultations, building on what we've already discussed, as bb has just formed a new government as i am entering my second term, that you know, we continue to have close consultation around some of the shared interests that we've already discussed. iran being, obviously, a prominent shared concern. i want to make sure that the israel people and israeli government make sure how i'm approaching problem. and i want to make sure how the israeli government and prime minister is approaching these problems to make sure there are no misunderstandings there. with respect to the peace process as i've said, i'll have more to say about this tomorrow. but i think you're absolutely right over the last year, year and a half, two years, two and a half years, we haven't gone forward. we haven't seen the progress that we would like to see. there's some elements of good news. i mean, the fact of the matter is even with all that's been happening in the region, the palestinian authority has worked effectively in cooperation with the international community in part because of some of the training that we, the united
the facts before me, that we know the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those in the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. the broader point is, is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> warner: both leaders spoke extensively about iran and about the different timetables the countries are on for possible military action to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. mr. obama said he thinks there is still time for diplomacy but added: >> each country has to make its own decisions when it comes to the awesome decision to engage in any kind of military action. and israel is differently situated than the united states, and i would not expect that the prime minister would make a decision about his country's security and defer that to any other country, any more than the united states would defer our de
on the cost of government and government run pension, unionized government workforce and bobby jindal with school choice. he is planning to abolish the corporate individual income tax moving in a very different direction the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. there is a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign in the senate races in the success of the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: we are taking your calls with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. our farmland or open democrats (202)585-3880 and republicans (202)585-3881. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget? >> there are two major differences and they certainly going different directions. paul ryan's budget balances in 10 years and is not raise taxes and patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. what the democrats and pa
, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address to preserve our planet commanded to our care by god. i lay no claim to religious authority, but i must believe this -- something that harms others, something that disturbs god's creation, something that stands on lies and greed, protecting that must not be consistent with god's will. in his 2010 world day of peace message entitled "if you want to cultivate peace, protect creation," pope benedict xvi called upon the faithful, and i quote -- "to protect the environment and to safeguard natural resources and the clim
government would be with peace toward the palestinians. let me be clear -- israel remains fully committed to peace and to the solution of a .wo state for two peoples we extend our hands in peace and friendship to the palestinian people. i hope that your visit him along with the visit of the secretary of state kerry help us turn a page in relations with the palestinians. let us sit down at the negotiating table. let us work together to achieve the historic compromise that will end our conflict once and for all. let me conclude on a personal note. i know how valuable the time and energy is of the american president, yourself. this is the 10th time we have met since you became president and since i became prime minister. you have chosen israel is your fort and then you -- venue your foreign visit and your second term. thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening that friendship and alliance between our two countries. it is deeply appreciated. you have come here on the eve of passover. i've always considered it it as our most cherished holiday. it celebr
at this in a small section of society. what is the south korean government going to do about it? >> reporter: yeah, i think you're right. south korea is one of the most connected countries in the world. north korea one of the least connected at presence very minimal on the internet, but the upper echelons even have access to the internet. but they have illustrated they have put a lot of effort, training, resources into getting the best and brightest in north korea trained up on cyber warfare tactics. they're very prevalent on the inside in attacking particularly south korean institutions, they've done it on a number of occasions. south korea has been trying to address that. they've got their own training college to sort of sort of train cyber warriors. they also have a special committee they formed just today to tackle this crisis whether they're going to identify the threat they say and implement the kind of countermeasures they say they need to prevent this from ever happening again. >> matthew chance, thank you so much from seoul, south korea. >>> well, tensions rising over the civil war in syria.
with hank greenberg and the a.i.g. story and why he is suing the government on behalf of the stockholders after the government bailed out a.i.g. and paid back the money with interest. >> the fact had to come out what really happened. the so-called accounting scandal turned out toe virally nothing. the corporate governance of the united states changed after enron. boards became more critical of almost anything that everybody was doing but i wanted -- more importantly i wanted the 92,000 people that helped build a.i.g. and all the things they did to make it the greatest insurance company in history. that story had to be told on their behalf as well. >> rose: a president's visit and the story of hank greenberg when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama will travel to the mile east this week. it will be his first time visiting since he entered the white house four years ago. he will meet newly reelected prime minister benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem on wednesday. the president has often been c
ensure that the iranian government forsakes nuclear weapons. peace is far more preferable to war. the inevitable costs, the unintended consequences that would come with war means that we have to do everything we can to try to resolve this diplom diplomatical diplomatically. because of the cooperation between our governments, we know that there remains time to pursue a diplomatic resolution. that's what america will do with clear eye, working with a world that's united and with the sense of urgency that's required. but iran must know this time is not unlimited. and i've made the position the united states of america clear. iran must not get a nuclear weapon. this is not a danger that can be contained, and as president i've said all options are on the table for achieving our objectives. america will do what we must to prevent a nuclear-armed iran. [ applause ] for young israelis, i know that these issues of security are rooted in an experience that's even more fundamental than the pressing threat of the day. you live in a neighborhood where many of your neighbors have rejected the
has already used weapons of mass murder. >> the rebels say the government unleashed the chemical weapons. the regime leaders claim they are the real victims here. now, an international investigation into a possible crime against humanity. the apollo rockets brought mankind to the moon. but the rocketd engines fell back to earth. tonight, the mission to recover them from the ocean depth. and animal abuse caught on camera. now, a beach closed down because of what workers saw these women doing to some seals. with or without food. my doctor recommends citracal maximum. it's all about absorption. ♪reflective guitar♪ tony stewart: time teaches you things. you learn to look up to people with the courage to do what they love. that it's more than just a living, it's life. and in that time i've found that's the difference between leaders and everyone else. you'll have to pay five hundred bucks for your deductible. the truth? at allstate, you could pay zero. allstate gives you a hundred dollars off your deductible the day you sign up. then another hundred off every year you don't have a
are sort of the first step to the government coming into your house and trying to take away your guns. so that, i think, has been the, you know, the strength of their appeal. much more so than dollars and cents. they're part of the culture in parts of the country. >> we put that poll up, and we saw support for some level of gun control go up after newtown. now it seems to be slipping back a little bit more. i think karen has a great point, rana. it really is that slippery slope argument. >> it is. listen, i grew up in rural indiana. i understand parts of the country have different attitudes about guns. again, i think we've really gotten a twisted view of what the american norm is. if you go back to the 19th century or the earlier part of the 20th century, gun control laws were much stricter, even in free-wheeling -- or places perceived as being free wheeling like texas, colorado, western states. i think that our sense of normal has just moved so far away from what a middle point is that we need to get back there. >> rana, karen, thanks to both of you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >>> also
are governed not simply by men and women but by laws. we're fueled by entrepreneurship and innovation and we are defined by a democratic discourse that allows each generation to reimagine and renew our union once more. so in israel, we see value that is we share. even as we recognize what makes us different. that is an essential part of our bonds. now, i stand here today mindful that for both our nations these are some complicated times. we have difficult issues to work through within our own countries and we face dangers and upheavel around the world. and when i look at young people within the united states, i think about the choices they must make in their lives to define who will be as a nation in this 21st century particularly as we emerge from two wars and the worst recession since the great depression. but part of the reason i like talking to young people is because no matter how great the challenges are, their idealism, their energy, their ambition lways gives me hope. and i see the same spirit in the young people here today. i believe that you will shape our future and given the ties
and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing into the regime of the time. if we discussed the threat to iran stabilizing, weapons would also be a threat to the united states and its interest in the region. host: independent line, florida, welcome to the program. caller: welcome, gentlemen. i would like to posit, if i may, we are talking about netanyahu and israeli intransigence when it comes
place, leading to huge securityish a us in egypt next door. egypt has a government. not entirely functioning government but it hasn't cancelled the historic peace treaty with israel. but security situation in egypt is collapsing all around it and that is the real fear, if they have total collapse. al qaeda elements increasingly large roles in the opposition. and a real issue of authority next door in syria, post assad. >> martin, let's talk about the other major issue here that is certainly on the agenda there. president perez said today after his meeting, that israel trusts the u.s. policy to prevept iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. not just to contain, but to prevent. do you foresee, martin, any change from the administration towards iran either in action or tone? >> i would imagine that the administration does not want any change for the time being. and i would just like to add to your introduction. i'm not sure it is true to say israel trust the united states completely. they need to say that they do and they need to believe the united states because they are still -- th
billion bailout package from the government at the height of the financial crisis. now he is suing the federal government alleging they mistreated stockholders in the course of the bailout. his new book "the a.i.g. story" tells the story of the company's dramatic history. in the interest of full disclosure, c.d. starr foundation was an underwriter of this program in the past and i'm pleased to have hank greenberg back at this table, welcome. >> thank you. the. >> rose: why this book >> several reasons. i thought the facts first of all -- the facts had to come out what really happened. the so-called accounting scandal turned out to be nothing. if after enron boards became more critical of almost anything that everybody was doing but more importantly i wanted the 92 people that helped build a.i.g. and all the things they did to make it the greatest insurance company in history, that story had to be told on their behalf as well. >> rose: this book is how he be built -- >> rose: i joined at the end of '60, a.i.g. went public in the late '60s. >> rose: ran a.i.g. in new york and c.e.o.
the threat of a government shutdown next week. not shutting down the whole federal government used to be the kind of thing you could reasonably expect from your congress, the kind of thing they get done as a matter of course. under house speaker john boehner, not shutting down the government has become a notable achievement for this congress. mozle top on that. a low bar. >>> house republicans also voted today again for the paul ryan budget. democrats are very excited about that because they plan to use that vote against republicans in campaign ads for the next election. we have the one and only ezra klein here momentarily to sort out what's important about what they just voted on in congress and whether we just avoided one of the cliff slash ceilings clash crisis congress now schedules for us every few weeks and whether the way they avoided this next one is itself important. there's a lot going on in the news. we have a lot ahead. we begin tonight with late breaking and rather surprising news from the democratic leader in the senate, senator harry reid. following two days of angry
use its airspace to shuttle weapons and soldiers to the syrian government >> for those of us engaged in the effort to see president assad step down and a see a democratic process take hold with a transitional government government according to the geneva communique, for those of us engaged in that effort, anything that supports president assad is problematic. bill: so iran claims the flights contain humanitarian supplies. conor powell in the middle east bureau in jerusalem. first of all who is behind the car bomb, the car bomb hit on the rebel commander? >> reporter: so often is the case, bill, really tough to get accurate information coming out of syria. but it is not clear if it was the syrian regime that launched this assassination attempt or if it was sort of opposition rebel fact -- faction that may have launched attack on the colonel of the he is reportedly in stable condition in turkey after the attack. he was one of the original founders of the free syrian army. it has been somewhat marge alized last several months. the colonel was never able to. the attack occurred while tou
. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> bret: good evening. i'm bret baier. from the israeli government perspective, a country living with the threat of a nuclear iran possibly. president obama said the right things. during his visit about making sure iran does not get a nuclear weapon. at least one israeli leader is convinced if push comes to shove and military action is needed, the u.s. will be right alongside israel. amid the talk of war, though, the president is also pushing for peace between israelis and palestinians. that effort take a different tone on a specific issue today. chief white house correspondent ed henry is traveling with the president and reports from jerusalem. >> president obama spent a second day in jerusalem showing he is mending fences with israeli leaders to get upclose look at the dead sea scrolls and later trying to go around the leaders to appeal to the young people of israel to talk up peace. >> look to a future in which jews and muslims and christians can all live in peace and greater prosperity in this holy land. >> while also holding out the threat of war. again, vo
's the whole issue of governing, management of the vatican and that's going to keep him very busy, indeed. >> yeah. just an immense amount of work that needs to be done. >> big job ahead of him. ben wedeman. there was one person who definitely did not want francis to become pope. >> someone rather close to him, knows him very well. the former argentine cardinal, we are talking about his sister, maria. take a listen to what she said. >>. >> translator: i pray that he wouldn't get elected. during the conclave, i was praying that the holy spirit would intervene and not listen to my prayers. and it didn't listen to me. >> translator: it didn't listen to you? >> no, it did as it pleased. >> she's very happy for her brother and it's quite likely her life will change, too. you can imagine the media folks hounding her. >> we're not going to leave her alone. >> forget about it. >> want to get back to a top story. financial crisis brewing in europe. cyprus needing a bailout. the country's parliament ready to vote on a plan that includes one-time tax on most of the country's bank accounts. >> contro
year. >> and he said the basis of hostility with iran is the u.s. government. we'll have the latest on president obama's trip to the region live from jerusalem. >>> the united nations is going to launch an investigation into whether chemical weapons were indeed used in syria. both the syrian regime and the opposition asked the u.n. to look into the claim. >> the demand came after both sides accused each other of firing chemical weapons on tuesday. opposition groups insist rebels don't have access to such material. >> and u.s. officials saying they welcome the move. >>> first up, north korea's new and threatening message. pyongyang warning today it has the capability to strike u.s. bases in guam and japan. >> matthew chance joining us now from seoul, south korea. matthew, is this north korea's typical bluster or something more ominous here? >> it's really difficult to say, fredricka, because it's such an unpredictable regime. but what we do know is these threats are being made all the time now. there's a lot of tension that's been growing on the korean peninsula, tension that is bein
of the state legislatures, governor's mansions, and there's a difference between state government and the federal government. the absurdity in a state capital, that we did not have a budget for three years, yet here in washington the senate did not pass a budget for three years and the president just not serious about what americans think is the biggest problem of that country. they do not even have a budget for three years? state government, closer to the people, has to get things done. i used to tell trent lott, the difference between governors and senators is senators talk about doing things and governors do things. there's a lot of truth to democrat governors as well. their party is so committed to washington that you do not see many of these governors who are willing to talk the way republican governors are about how we do a better job at the state level. there's much more bipartisanship. i like to think i had a relative success will governorship, but eight of my eight years of governor, i have a democrat house majority, and seven of my years, i had a democrat senate majority
of every american. >> a great many of us, place included have deep concerns about the government collecting information on citizenry. >> we are trying to take a document in the constitution, written many years ago. apply it to the mod earn world. at times we have had to struggle with that. >> faa projecting 10,000 operating systems by 2017, witnesses say the benefits range from forest fire to find missing chirp for $25 an hour. >> they range from $250 no thousands of dollars an hour. this costs just one sent to charge the battery we use inside the system. >> financial benefits are obvious, there bipartisan warns that the case law is non-existent. setting 5 supreme court ruling. >> i am amazed that the case that is sought by all side of reliance, 1986 case, involving aerial surveillance from airplane. >> how long do you think a drone can fly before impacting the amendment? >> 400-foot mark by the supreme court but is an open question on if the lower surveillance vehicles would be included the reasonable expectation of privacy or the personal trespass. >> lawmakers told they been ban commerc
, to the prestige and credibility of the u.s. government are daunting and dismaying if we found the wmd it would have been different. it totally would have been different but we didn't. >> sure. right. >> so are the american people more likely to question the challenge of this country being capable and on a proper premise to go into war? >> absolutely. i mean, those poll numbers that you cited way back when, ten years ago, were reflective of what the american people were told by its government, by its president, its secretary of state, its secretary of defense. the case was made for going to war with iraq. you know, in a time of war the american people rally around the president. but as more information came out, as more facts and corrections of the record came out, the american people saw that they were in essence lied to about getting into a war, not one of necessity but one of choice. and so i think going forward, particularly with the saber rattling with iran and what's being talked about with north korea and its belligerence, the american people are going to be very cautious. i should say m
works towards a nuclear weapon. and as we try to determine whether the government of syria has already deployed chemical weapons against its own people. because, in the words of our president, that would be a game changer. >> we have to make sure that we know exactly what happened, what was the nature of the incident, that what can we document? what can we prove. i have instructed my teams to work closely with all of the countries in the region and international organizations and institutions. to find out precisely whether or not this red line was crossed. >> shepard: talk of syria dominated much of the president's news conference in jerusalem this afternoon. he spoke alongside benjamin netanyahu. just a day after both the syrian regime and the syrian rebels accused each other of deploying chemical weapons. now, so far u.s. officials say they have no evidence that those accusations are true on either side. but president obama says he is deeply skeptical that of any claim that the opposition rebels used chemical weapons at all. he did not say the same of the syrian regime. we have team
, let's get to governing, what we do is go in for the kill. because in a knife fight between a liberal and a conservative a conservative will stab ya and then they'll step on the wound, and break your neck and then put you in the trunk next to the other bodies -- >> hal: and a liberal will say here is my knife. >> right. >> hal: on that note we will let you go. karl frisch, karl frisch.com some fantastic stuff. not the least of which is on your sight, karlfrisch.com. you have a -- >> youth in government it changed my life. >> hal: so not only is karl frisch's site great in and of it's a, but also if you got a moment, and -- and you are leaning that way at all, you know, go by there, click on the link and donate. >> and he tends to be super funny. >> i try to be. >> there is no try, karl. there just is. >> hal: thank you yoda jacki. thank you karl frisch for leaving us on a yoda laugh. >> take chair. >> hal: we're going to talk about the president's trip to israel. and the difficult issues of the middle east peace process, dealing with the israeli palestinians and
, a new report for the government. and absolutely slams freddy mack. why? >> troubling reports concerning freddie mac, inspector general of the federal housing finance agency, saying they aren't doing such a good job of working out complaints from homeowners. they found that freddie's eight biggest servicers resolved more than 25,000 complaints. that sounds great, but they failed to take care of more than 20% of them in the required 30-day window. that's even after they moved the case up the chain of command. a huge problem, when it comes to serious complaints like servicing fraud and improper foreclosures, what it means, people could potentially lose their homes while these services are twiddling their thumbs on cases. the report it found that four of freddie servicers never reported any cases in this period, even though they handled more than 20,000 of them, so this watchdog agency put out recommendations. we'll see if those recommendations go anywhere. carol. >> alison kosik live from the new york stock exchange. >>> a little politics/entertainment. a fresh dose of sarah palin when she
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